Why the next iPhone probably won’t be made of Liquidmetal

May 3, 2012
Tech

As soon as this June’s Worldwide Developers Conference (although likely after that), Apple will have a liquidity event that has nothing to do with its stock price of future public offerings. Since 2010, Apple has had the exclusive rights to use Liquidmetal alloy in its iDevices. The state-of-the-art manufacturing technology not only looks slick, but […]

As soon as this June’s Worldwide Developers Conference (although likely after that), Apple will have a liquidity event that has nothing to do with its stock price of future public offerings.

Since 2010, Apple has had the exclusive rights to use Liquidmetal alloy in its iDevices. The state-of-the-art manufacturing technology not only looks slick, but reportedly will function better that any incumbent building material.

As the 2012 WWDC is now less than six weeks ago, we are entering the peak of rumor season when many of us are predicting what, if any, new iDevices or revolutionary products Apple will debut. While the iPhone 4S was released only last fall, and the “new” iPad came out earlier this year, the WWDC did debut the iPhone 4 only two years ago and is traditionally a time for major announcements.

In advance, Business Insider caught up with Liquidmetal inventor Atakan Peker to ask if and when his technology will eventually be incorporated into iPhones/iPads, etc.

Here are the CliffsNotes as provided by Business Insider:

  • Incredibly strong and durable.
  • Apple has exclusive rights to use Liquidmetal in gadgets.
  • It could be a few more years before Apple can make a Liquidmetal MacBook.
  • Apple will likely wait to use Liquidmetal in a “breakthrough product.”
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Brad Spirrison

Brad Spirrison is the managing editor of appoLearning and Appolicious Inc. In this capacity, he has sampled and evaluated thousands of iOS and Android applications. He also holds an M.A. in Education and Media Ecology from New York University.

Spirrison worked in concert with appoLearning Expert and Instructional Technology Specialist Leslie Morris while curating and evaluating educational applications.

A longtime media and technology commentator and executive, Spirrison is also a regular contributor to ABC News, The Huffington Post, TechCrunch, Bloomberg West and The Christopher Gabriel Program.

Spirrison is married and lives with his wife and young son in Chicago. As his son was born just weeks before the debut of the iPad, Spirrison takes his work home with him and regularly samples and enjoys a variety of educational applications for young children.

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