The new iPad “can run significantly hotter,” says Consumer Reports

Mar 20, 2012
Tech

As Brad Spirrison discussed earlier, Apple has a potential PR issue on their hands again, this time concerning the new iPad. Reports are emerging from customers that the new iPad gets rather hot with prolonged use. For some people, it’s merely a gentle warming when performing graphically-intensive activities, for others though, warning messages are appearing […]

As Brad Spirrison discussed earlier, Apple has a potential PR issue on their hands again, this time concerning the new iPad.

Reports are emerging from customers that the new iPad gets rather hot with prolonged use. For some people, it’s merely a gentle warming when performing graphically-intensive activities, for others though, warning messages are appearing when their iPads get too hot telling them “iPad needs to cool down before you can use it.”

Now the folks at Consumer Reports have stepped up with a new report at their website, and a colorful picture showing a ‘heatmap’ for the new iPad in comparison to the older iPad 2.

“The new iPad can run significantly hotter than the earlier iPad 2 model when running an action game, Consumer Reports testers have found.

“Using a thermal imaging camera, Consumer Reports engineers recorded temperatures as high as 116 degrees Fahrenheit on the front and rear of the new iPad while playing Infinity Blade II.”

This all might sound a little alarming, but Consumer Reports concluded that while the back of the new iPad was very warm to the touch, it certainly wasn’t uncomfortable.

Cause for concern or simply scare-mongering? We’ll see what other news arises over the next few days about this, and whether Apple will properly acknowledge it as a problem and offer a potential way to fix it.

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Marty Gabel

Marty is the former Associate Editor for Appolicious and AndroidApps.com. He lives with his wife and infant daughter in Chicago, via London, England, and the San Francisco Bay Area.

You can follow him on Twitter, but he rarely tweets about work. Instead, he'll likely be flaunting his ham-fisted photography or spreading viral videos of silly cats.

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