Terminator Genysis: Future War – Journey Back to the Future of 2015

Jul 1, 2017
Strategy

Terminator Genysis: Future War is a peculiar game, to be sure. Not for its gameplay, which is fine but nothing out of the ordinary for a mobile MMORPG strategy game. No, what’s weird about Terminator Genysis: Future War is that it’s a tie-in game for the movie Terminator: Genysis… released two years after the movie.

A license tie-in game over a year after the movie it’s based on would be weird enough on its own, but two years is a really long time. It doesn’t help that while the film certainly made money back, it was critically panned. So, was it worth the wait? Is Terminator Genysis: Future War‘ dystopian future of 2028 a fun option for fans of the franchise?

Well, to answer that question, let me posit you a question. Do you enjoy management games? Do you like mobile strategy MMOs like Clash of Clans? If you said no, then this isn’t a game for you. There is basically no action component to speak of other than ordering armies out into the field to collect resources and attack enemies. You would be much better off with Terminator Genysis: Guardian, an action packed third-person shooter. However, if you do like managing bases and crunching numbers, then Terminator Genysis: Future War is your ideal game. It’s a highly polished, and dare I say fluid, MMORPG strategy game.

Terminator Genysis Future War Review | Appolicious

If you’re looking to scratch that strategy itch and love the Terminator universe, Terminator Genysis: Future War is the dark, foreboding future you’ve been waiting for. Read our review: https://appolicious.com/terminator-genysis-future-war-journey-back-to-the-future-of-2015

That’s probably the best aspect of Terminator Genysis: Future War, and I have to attribute that to the extra time spent in development. Every action is intuitive, and the game is constantly rewarding you for new actions while directing you towards your next objective. I never thought I’d say this in a review, but these menus are fantastic. Whenever you need to upgrade something, it’s just a tap away from checking out what’s required and get everything in order. If you’re not sure what to do next, a massive list of quests keep you building up a competent base as you learn the mechanics.

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Along with this, there’s even a nice bonus for new players where once any building project is at five minutes or less to completion, you can instantly finish it for free. You also get a shield generator at the start, ensuring you aren’t turned to grease by higher level players while getting your feet wet. This makes getting started so much easier, as does the sizable stockpile of starting resources and time boosters.

Every action is intuitive, and the game is constantly rewarding you for new actions while directing you towards your next objective.

Since almost all your time is spent navigating the myriad menus, it’s key that these elements be done properly, and developer Plarium LLC clearly understands this. They also do a marvelous job of integrating the Terminator aesthetics into the game. The barren wasteland of 2028 is prime fodder for this sort of game, and if you opt to fight for Skynet, you get the T-1000 as your tour guide through how to play. It doesn’t push the fiction further, but it’s nicely executed.

That is the most prominent thing about Terminator Genysis: Future War. Normally, a license tie-in game is rushed out the door half-completed. Here, it’s remarkably well done. It doesn’t push any boundaries, but if you’re looking to scratch that strategy itch and love the Terminator universe, Terminator Genysis: Future War is the dark, foreboding future you’ve been waiting for.

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Available on iOS and Android.

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Elijah Beahm

Elijah is a man who can't stop talking about games, geeky things, and to the chagrin of his colleagues, horrible puns. He's been working as a game journalist for several years now, and in addition to Appolicious, His other work can be found at GameCritics.com, I Need Diverse Games, and The Unabridged Gamer on YouTube. When not reviewing games, you'll probably find him ranting on Twitter, writing, or replaying Dead Space 2 for the zillionth time.

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