Senators look to block controversial app; WSJ selling single servings

Mar 23, 2011
Tech

The App Store is in the headlines again, but this time it’s due to the US Senate looking to get some apps removed. Meanwhile, The Wall Street Journal is offering the paper one issue at a time beginning this morning. Senate aims to stop DUI-friendly apps It’s been a busy week for the App Store, […]

The App Store is in the headlines again, but this time it’s due to the US Senate looking to get some apps removed. Meanwhile, The Wall Street Journal is offering the paper one issue at a time beginning this morning.

Senate aims to stop DUI-friendly apps

It’s been a busy week for the App Store, hasn’t it? Amidst the controversy over the Exodus International app and Apple suing Amazon over the rights to the term “App Store,” the tech leader has certainly had its hands full. Add one more log to the fire, as now it seems the United States Senate is asking Apple to clean up their store a bit more.

According to CNET, a group of senators have written a letter to Apple’s senior vice president of iPhone software, Scott Forstall, urging him to remove apps that may be helping drivers avoid DUI checkpoints.

Although there are no apps mentioned by name in the letter, CNET points to apps like Fuzz Alert Pro as the exact kind the senators are likely speaking about.

It’s curious that these apps were ever approved in the first place, because as the CNET story points out, one of the more clear ways to violate Apple’s policy on apps is to create apps that encourage excessive alcohol consumption. It’s hard to think of an app that would fit that bill more than a constantly updating directory advising people on how they can steer clear of DUI checkouts.

READ  The Ultimate Guide to Phone Security

WSJ on your iPad as often as you want it

The Wall Street Journal is about to lift the shackles on its subscription system. Until today, users could read the Wall Street Journal one of two ways: either via the limited, free version that was offered in the App Store, or trough a full digital subscription that cost 3.99 per week.

As Mashable reported, that’ll change today when anyone will be able to get a full digital copy of the journal for $1.99 an issue.

Readers will also be able to buy the last seven days worth of issues in case they miss one here or there, though if you’re buying two issues a week the smart money would rest with getting the fully subscription.

In fact, according to the article, that’s exactly the idea – to wean people on a trial basis and get them to want to purchase the full subscription.

That plan certainly has its merits, and if it works, could become the blueprint for app publishing subscriptions in the future.

Search for more

Dan Kricke

Dan Kricke has been playing with electronics and writing about them for years. He loved his Sega Dreamcast and now the PlayStation 3. On the iPhone, he's a fan of sports apps and anything that offers new music.

 

    Home Apps Games