Remembering September 11, 2001 with an app

Sep 6, 2011
Tech

This Sunday marks a decade since that day that changed our world. Thousands of Americans died on that date at the hand of Jihadists. America went to war. Earlier this year, Navy SEALS took out Osama bin Laden. But let’s not forget where this all started 10 years ago, the site formerly occupied by the […]

This Sunday marks a decade since that day that changed our world. Thousands of Americans died on that date at the hand of Jihadists. America went to war. Earlier this year, Navy SEALS took out Osama bin Laden.

But let’s not forget where this all started 10 years ago, the site formerly occupied by the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center.

9/11 is a day to reflect on where we were on that day, how our world has been altered and where we are headed.

A new app for the iPad can help you sort this out with a visit to Ground Zero virtually or ideally while visiting the actual site. The iPad app delivers “history in your hands.”

On Sept. 1, documentary producer and entrepreneur Steven Rosenbaum, possibly the world’s largest curator of photos and videos related to the site, released The 911 Memorial: Past, Present and Future.Todd Wasserman tells about the app at Mashable: “It provides everything from details about the Twin Towers’ construction in the 1960s to details about the day of the attack to information about the National 9/11 Museum’s creation. Rosenbaum says the iPad app was designed so people could skip around to the parts they wanted to see.”

The 911 Memorial: Past, Present and Future app features 400 still images edited down from 22,000 from the day of the attacks until a few weeks ago. Developers boiled down 400 hours of video to an hour. The app is available for free through 9/11 and thereafter for $9.99.

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The National September 11 Memorial & Museum a year ago made available for free an app for iPhone with an audio and photo tour of the Twin Towers site and a timeline. First responders, rescue workers, volunteers, and those who lived and worked in Lower Manhattan on 9/11 tell the story.

“We understand it takes thousands of people to make history, and we are building a museum that acknowledges that,” Jake Barton, founder of the media design firm Local Projects, which made the app and is a lead exhibition designer for the museum, told Digits. “This is one thing that digital technology does exceptionally well, and it’s literally something you could not have approached 20 years ago, 50 years ago.”

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