No, Human? More like yes, download!

Sep 10, 2010
Games

No, Human opens with a terrific introduction. What at first looks like a human’s call to arms to colonize all of the universe quickly turns into “the universe” (a gigantic thing that looks sort of like a Venus fly trap) flicking a fireball at a spaceship and declaring that it will continue to do so, […]

No, Human opens with a terrific introduction. What at first looks like a human’s call to arms to colonize all of the universe quickly turns into “the universe” (a gigantic thing that looks sort of like a Venus fly trap) flicking a fireball at a spaceship and declaring that it will continue to do so, just for fun.

So your journey begins, as the omnipotent hand of fate, throwing fireballs at spaceships and satellites for 50 mildly puzzling levels. Each level presents some challenge to getting to your target. Whether it’s knocking one fireball into the other to cause a chain reaction, or maneuvering through force fields or ice, there’s always something in No, Human to contend with.

Mostly, these challenges are more clever than difficult. Using an object’s gravitational pull to slingshot to your target, for instance, isn’t hard to figure out, but it is quite fun to pull off.

No, Human also has its tongue firmly in cheek at all times. At one point, you have to cross an asteroid field to get to your target. If you’re stopped by the asteroids, the game delivers a clear message: “Didn’t you see the asteroids?”

The clever jokes make it easy to overlook the sloppy polygons that make up the visuals in No, Human. This isn’t particular pretty or interesting visually, but it’s enjoyable enough that the aesthetics don’t feel important.

That said, while I would quickly recommend No, Human to anyone looking for a fun quasi-puzzle game, don’t expect it to last you long, either. The game’s 50 puzzles won’t take more than a few hours to best, at most. That doesn’t strike me as a bad thing, but it’s always nice to know the length of your mission when you’re headed into space.

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Dan Kricke

Dan Kricke has been playing with electronics and writing about them for years. He loved his Sega Dreamcast and now the PlayStation 3. On the iPhone, he's a fan of sports apps and anything that offers new music.

 

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