Marine Sharpshooter takes aim and hits a winner

Oct 14, 2009
Games

Two rules govern Marine Sharpshooter: One, snipers are badass, lone warriors, and two, they can take a bullet. The grunts on the ground might be taking heavy fire during military missions barging in on enemy territory, but as a sniper, your job is to be arguably more vulnerable, lay in wait, and seize the right […]

Two rules govern Marine Sharpshooter: One, snipers are badass, lone warriors, and two, they can take a bullet.

The grunts on the ground might be taking heavy fire during military missions barging in on enemy territory, but as a sniper, your job is to be arguably more vulnerable, lay in wait, and seize the right moment to squeeze of the requisite head shots in the name of the almighty mission. There are plenty of sniper simulators, but Marine Sharpshooter sets itself apart by streamlining to the point of arcade-like accessibility.

Your mission is to take down the terrorist threat known as Crimson Fang by whatever means necessary. That task is broken down into five zones which each contain five areas that must be scanned for the enemy. The entire zone must be cleared of Crimson Fang within five minutes.

You can withstand a couple of retaliation shots once you’ve been spotted but while you are zeroing in on an area, you can take as long as you want to determine where to make your first kill. After that, all bets are off. Everyone in the area knows where you are, and you must calmly scan the buildings and towers to dispense of them.

Your scope flashes red in the general direction that gunfire is coming from, making the feat a bit easier, but for some reason you won’t be able to zoom in closer to shoot at legs or arms obscured by windows. You’ll have to wait until the soldiers politely come back out to be killed—and the time limit and hail of enemy fire means you won’t always have the luxury of taking a head shot.

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Marine Sharpshooter gets repetitive but it’s an immersive repetition that assures you’ll play it through to completion at least a couple of times. As a 99 cent game, there’s no reason not to.

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David Wolinsky

David Wolinsky is the Chicago city editor for The Onion's A.V. Club and is also the  undisputed 1994 Blockbuster store champion at collecting bananas in Donkey Kong Country.

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