JellyCar 2 iPhone app puts users in the driver’s seat

Nov 13, 2009
Games

When I started telling people I was checking out the new JellyCar 2, everyone seemed to know what the original was. It seems that the original has a lot of fans out there, and they won’t be disappointed by the newly released-sequel. Available on the iPhone and iPod touch for 99 cents, JellyCar 2 is […]

When I started telling people I was checking out the new JellyCar 2, everyone seemed to know what the original was. It seems that the original has a lot of fans out there, and they won’t be disappointed by the newly released-sequel. Available on the iPhone and iPod touch for 99 cents, JellyCar 2 is a lot like the original, but with more levels to play and three new modes of play as well, making it so much better than the first.

For those unfamiliar with the original, JellyCar is a driving game that is also a bit like a puzzle. Using both tilt and touch, players drive through an obstacle course. Players use the fingers on their right and left hand to increase their speed or brake. Of course, it wouldn’t be JellyCar if everything didn’t wave and bend like a bowl of Jello Jigglers. For JellyCar 2, the developers have increased the number of levels to 28, meaning there is even more fun to enjoy. The game is easy to get a handle of and navigate through, but is difficult enough to keep you occupied.

In JellyCar 2, there are three new modes of play as well. The “Factory Mode” is more of a shapes game, where you move levers to guide shapes into their correct bin. In “Long Jump” mode, the goal is to launch your car and see how far you can get it. In “Custom” mode, you build your own car. The addition of the Custom mode adds a lot of fun to the game, since it lets you choose the style of your car for play.

With these improvements and expansions, JellyCar 2 is clearly a better game and a lot of fun. This app had me showing it to friends, but it’s downside was that they all wanted to play next.

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Matthew Hendrickson

Matthew Hendrickson is a freelance writer and Editor and Chief of Jettison Quarterly. He lives in Chicago's Pilsen neighborhood and has a degree in journalsim from Columbia College. He has written for the Chicago Journal, The Chicago Reporter, and ChicagoTalks.  His three-part story about lead poisoning rates in Chicago was featured at Propublica.org and IRE.org.

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