Fresh iPhone Apps for Jan. 24: Sundance Film Festival 2011, Nomis, iReadG

Jan 24, 2011
Tech

It’s the week of the famous Sundance Film Festival, and the movie exhibition has its own official app filled with trailers, news, photos and other information about the festival and the films shown there. We’ve got all the details about it, and a few other interesting apps, in today’s Fresh Apps list. Sundance Film Festival […]

It’s the week of the famous Sundance Film Festival, and the movie exhibition has its own official app filled with trailers, news, photos and other information about the festival and the films shown there. We’ve got all the details about it, and a few other interesting apps, in today’s Fresh Apps list.

Sundance Film Festival 2011 (iPhone, iPad) $4.99

One of the biggest film festivals of the year is going on right now in Utah, and most of us aren’t there to to check it out. For us (and even for the people who get to attend), there’s Sundance’s official app, which includes original content from the festival like interviews, event videos, news posts and photographs.

If you’re attending the festival, the app provides film guides and a screening schedule. There’s also a history section that gives all kinds of information about the festival itself, the jurors judging it and the awards that are available. You can also watch trailers from the movies that are featured and follow Twitter, Facebook and YouTube feeds from Sundance, all from your mobile device.

Nomis (iPhone, iPad) $1.99

Keeping up with new music releases can be tough. The industry is kind of huge, and news about smaller bands and their projects coming to the market sometimes gets lost in the noise of new albums coming out from hundreds of different acts in different genres. Nomis cuts through the clutter, using push notifications to keep you up-to-date on your favorite bands’ new releases — and automatically sensing what kind of music you’ll want to know about.

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Nomis searches through the tracks you’ve loaded onto your iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch to find out what you’re into, and keeps track of album releases from the bands you’ve already got on-hand. You can also preview tracks through the app and tap a button to buy them with iTunes.

iReadG (iPhone, iPad) $1.99

There are a lot of handy Google Reader apps, of which iReadG is one. It does a lot of things you would expect such a reader to do: it caches articles and images after syncing with your Google Reader account, and lets you customize which kinds you want to see and when. You can manage all your subscriptions from within the app, and of course read articles. All of which is fairly standard, but still useful.

The best part of the app, however, is that you can set it to sync at different intervals — every day, every other day, etc. — and then read articles while keeping your device offline. That way, you don’t need an Internet connection to view news articles, and the app still keeps itself up to date as you’ve specified. It’s a handy feature, and while not every Google Reader user will find it totally necessary, some will definitely appreciate the offline capabilities.

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Phil Hornshaw

Phil Hornshaw is a freelance writer, editor and author living in Los Angeles, dividing his time between playing video games, playing video games on his cell phone, and writing about playing video games. He’s also the co-author of So You Created a Wormhole: The Time Traveler’s Guide to Time Travel, which attempts to mix time travel pop culture with some semblance of science, as well as tips on the appropriate means of riding dinosaurs. Check out his profile.

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