Fresh iPhone Apps for Feb. 1: Food Network update, BookPlayground, Dungeon Crawlers, Mystery of the Japanese Werewolf

Feb 1, 2012
Games

Spend the back half of the week discovering great new recipes care of the Food Network with today’s leading Fresh iPhone App, Food Network in the Kitchen. Following that, we’ve got a new children’s book designed specifically for iOS, called The Skunk Who Couldn’t Spray. A couple of sharply written, witty titles make up today’s […]

Spend the back half of the week discovering great new recipes care of the Food Network with today’s leading Fresh iPhone App, Food Network in the Kitchen. Following that, we’ve got a new children’s book designed specifically for iOS, called The Skunk Who Couldn’t Spray. A couple of sharply written, witty titles make up today’s game selections: Dungeon Crawlers takes after the genre of the same name with turn-based tactical combat, and Mystery of the Japanese Werewolf marries a humorous story with old-school platformer gameplay.

Food Network In The Kitchen update (iPhone, iPad) $1.99

Food Network has compiled thousands of recipes from its popular on-air celebrity chefs, creating a compendium of food possibilities for fans looking to create at home the kinds of things they see on their screens. The app is filled with recipes that can be searched by ingredients or even by the chefs responsible for creating them, including Bobby Flay, Paula Deen and more.

In The Kitchen just went through a massive redesign, bringing new features to the fore as well as a big new update to the app’s user interface and general stability. It also includes features that allow users to mark and annotate their favorite recipes, or view and compare recipes side-by side.

BookPlayground – The Skunk Who Could Not Spray (iPhone, iPad) $0.99

The Skunk Who Could Not Spray is another children’s book designed specifically for iOS devices like the iPad, iPod Touch and iPhone, marrying a kid-friendly art style with features that help children enjoy stories and even learn to read, even if a parent isn’t handy to go through the story with them. The app employs a rhyming story that’s fully narrated, so kids can read along or just enjoy the story any time.

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Kids also get a few additional layers of interactivity out of The Skunk Who Could Not Spray. In addition to a story that encourages young people to accept themselves, the app includes interactive illustrations users can tap go animate and an original score to make the story more immersive.

Dungeon Crawlers (iPhone, iPad) $1.99

Based on the “dungeon crawler” genre that made PC titles like the Diablo series famous, Dungeon Crawler is a top-down game in which players control a group of adventurers as they explore dungeons and fight evil. The group contains several characters, each with unique abilities, which players control in turn-based battles with the baddies they encounter along the way.

Dungeon Crawlers contains a fairly deep, humorous story, along with 12 dungeons to explore and plenty of weapons and items to find to customize your characters. It also has Game Center support for achievements and leaderboards, and the developers promise regular content updates in the future as well.

Mystery of the Japanese Werewolf (iPhone, iPad) $0.99

Another game with an involved, humorous story is Mystery of the Japanese Werewolf. It takes the conventions of an 8-bit platformer from days gone by and revisits it, putting you in the shoes of katana-wielding adventurer Eileen as she embarks on a journey through a flying saucer to help a talking alien T-Rex. Yes, it’s as weird as it sounds.

Mystery of the Japanese Werewolf has a simple virtual button gameplay style that will remind players of a mix between Super Mario Bros. and the Metroid series, where the focus is on exploration and moving onward by acquiring new abilities. It also packs Game Center support, but probably the best feature of the old-school title is its often hilarious writing, which makes it worth a download even without the deliciously classic gameplay.

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Phil Hornshaw

Phil Hornshaw is a freelance writer, editor and author living in Los Angeles, dividing his time between playing video games, playing video games on his cell phone, and writing about playing video games. He’s also the co-author of So You Created a Wormhole: The Time Traveler’s Guide to Time Travel, which attempts to mix time travel pop culture with some semblance of science, as well as tips on the appropriate means of riding dinosaurs. Check out his profile.

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