Facebook’s interest in Android grows with Graph API support

May 24, 2010
Tech

Facebook put itself in a position to “take over the Web” with its Graph API, and it’s looking to do the same on a mobile level.  At the Google I/O conference in San Francisco last week, Facebook revealed its plans to unleash the Graph API on Android developers, making it possible to have deep-linking for […]

Facebook put itself in a position to “take over the Web” with its Graph API, and it’s looking to do the same on a mobile level.  At the Google I/O conference in San Francisco last week, Facebook revealed its plans to unleash the Graph API on Android developers, making it possible to have deep-linking for Facebook within Android apps. 

Dual benefits

This is a significant move, because it comes before any similar plans have been announced for the iPhone.  This speaks to the current and future expectations behind Facebook and Android developer platforms; as I mentioned in an earlier article, a focus on Android app development is something that’s still lacking from Facebook (in relation to the iPhone).

Looking to Google’s mobile platform to push its mobile initiative, the Facebook Graph API for Android will offer deep linking, OAuth support, and publish feed stories.  The idea is to make it easier for developers and users to have a seamless integration of Facebook with their Android apps.

This means that someone playing a game on his or her Android phone will be able to access another player’s Facebook profile.  In fact, games are an important part of Facebook’s long-term goals around the Graph API, and will hopefully help to spur game development for the Android platform. Finding a way to balance its Web and mobile presence for game interests has been a tricky act for Facebook and game developers.

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Larger implications

Of course, the larger implications of Facebook’s budding interest in the Android platform has the ability to move beyond mobile phones.  As Google revealed its ground-breaking television project at the I/O conference as well, Facebook may have just the right timing for expanding its own presence to TV screens.

The move could aid Facebook in its desire to become more involved with consumer-centric media, presenting itself as a primary sharing mechanism around the countless ways we’ll have to interact with the Web, mobile apps, and television.

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