CES, the “iSlate” tablet and the future of television

Jan 6, 2010
Finance

Enjoy watching your favorite television shows via these iPhone apps and other application-driven mobile devices?  The world no doubt will be exposed this week to plenty electronic gadgets and mobile devices promised to provide a new way to consume television on display at the Computer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. While it is possible that a few […]

Enjoy watching your favorite television shows via these iPhone apps and other application-driven mobile devices? 

The world no doubt will be exposed this week to plenty electronic gadgets and mobile devices promised to provide a new way to consume television on display at the Computer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. While it is possible that a few upstarts will rise to the top, no device has more potential to completely change how we watch, program and interactive with television and home entertainment than the Apple “iSlate” Tablet. 

Of course, the iSlate will be talked about and not seen at CES. The world will have to wait until January 27 to get an actual look at the device and its possibilities. But it doesn’t require a soothsayer to imagine the possibilities the 8-to-11 inch device will provide. Beyond just consuming television and other entertainment on the device, the iSlate and device-specific applications (much like iPhone apps) will become a portable entertainment center that can be plugged into anywhere at home or where you travel. 

So, enjoy the release of Google’s Nexus One iPhone and the tablet computer unveiled this week at CES by Microsoft and HP. But save your enthusiasm (and bank account) for the iSlate featured presentation that will be unveiled in the weeks and months to come. 

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Brad Spirrison

Brad Spirrison is the managing editor of appoLearning and Appolicious Inc. In this capacity, he has sampled and evaluated thousands of iOS and Android applications. He also holds an M.A. in Education and Media Ecology from New York University.

Spirrison worked in concert with appoLearning Expert and Instructional Technology Specialist Leslie Morris while curating and evaluating educational applications.

A longtime media and technology commentator and executive, Spirrison is also a regular contributor to ABC News, The Huffington Post, TechCrunch, Bloomberg West and The Christopher Gabriel Program.

Spirrison is married and lives with his wife and young son in Chicago. As his son was born just weeks before the debut of the iPad, Spirrison takes his work home with him and regularly samples and enjoys a variety of educational applications for young children.

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